Basics of Sex Trafficking – Part 3

Four states recently passed resolutions declaring pornography to be a public health crisis — Utah, Virginia, South Dakota and Arkansas. There is on-going public controversy about this connection, and how it impacts public health, freedom of speech, and women’s rights.

However, recent studies show that viewing pornography powerfully affects the brain, releasing pleasure chemicals much like what drugs do for the body. The addiction cycle leads to more tolerance of this activity, while seeking increasingly extreme forms of pornography to achieve the same degree of pleasure. It changes your brain, and degrades how you see yourself and others around you.

  • Teaches us that women are objects for pleasure
  • View real-world women as less attractive
  • More difficult to establish intimate relationships
  • Creates the expectation of pleasure on demand
  • More cultural acceptance of explicit sexual behavior
  • Decreases Our Sexual Satisfaction
  • Desensitizes us to Cruelty
  • Makes us want to watch more porn

The Triple A Engine

Access to pornography is ubiquitous and anonymous. A dangerous combination where the viewer has no accountability.

  • Accessible — At our fingertips via internet delivery to our smart phones, tables and connected devices
  • Anonymous — Can be done in complete privacy, there is no dedicated stores or public oversight
  • Affordable — Most of the time it is completely free of charge

According to Juniper Research, by 2017, a quarter of a billion people are expected to be accessing mobile adult content from their phones or tablets, an increase of more than 30% from 2013. Mobile adult video chat alone will have a compound annual growth rate of 25%.

Pornography users are among us all. No social group is exempt. A few facts include:

  • 65% of men view pornography at least once a month
  • Church-going men view pornography at basically the same rate as the rest of the men — 64%
  • 30% of women view pornography regularly
  • 15% of church-going women view pornography regularly
  • 12% of all web sites on the planet are pornographic
  • 25% of all search engine requests are pornography related, which is about 68 millions request each day.
  • The average age of the first exposure to internet porn is between 9 and 11 years old.

The Digital Native Generation

Access to internet technology is easier than ever, and kids start using it at a young age. Most of the time, the first experience with pornography is by accident.

  • Age 5, 50% go online daily
  • Age 8, 67% are online each day
  • By age 13, 73% have their own smartphone

Pornography makes sexually exploiting others seem normal. Our modern culture accepts pornography as normal. It encourages it. Pornography keeps pushing itself into our daily lives. Smart phones put it at our fingertips. It is an epidemic in our society. And it is driving up the demand for purchasing sex from women who have been trafficked.

Trafficking and pornography are direct attacks on the image of God in us. It destroys our ability to value others as God values them. It changes our brain so that we depend on degrading images for comfort and relief instead of God. God calls us to value and honor the image of God in everyone on this planet.

We are sons and daughters of the King. And we believe that we are called to be the protectors of the image of God within ourselves and the champions of the image of God in others.

“In the heart of every man is a desire to be brave, to be good, and to protect. In the heart of every woman is a desire to be beautiful, to be desired, to be the treasure.”

–Matt Fradd, Catholic apologist and speaker